Archive for the ‘Hull Photos’ Category

Hull Photos: 17/11/17 – 24/11/17

Saturday, December 23rd, 2017

Another digest of daily posts during Hull2017 on Facebook, about the pictures added daily on the intro page at Hull Photos. Comments and corrections to the captions and texts about the pictures are always welcome here or on Facebook.

Hull Photos

17th November

The view towards the east end of the dock with the Lord Line building, distinctive post-war offices for the trawler owners, which are currently being allowed to decay and when I visited in February were left open for vandals.

The Lord Line building deserves listing because of its part in Hull’s heritage and reasonably distinctive architecture, and it was sad it was not included in the 10 new listings announced to celebrate Hull2017 – and it is arguably rather more deserving than some that were included.

The tower of the Grade II listed hydraulic power accumulator stands out from the cluster of buildings at the right, but most of the other buildings have since been demolished, along with those to the left of Lord Line. Harpmyth Limited became Hytec Electrical (Hull) Ltd in 1984 and was wound up in 1992. Its postal address was North East Corner, St Andrews Dock, Hull, HU3 4S.


85-10k-24: St Andrew’s Dock & Lord Line building, 1985 – Docks

18th November

Taken from the identical viewpoint as the previous image, these two views were probably intended to be seen as a panoramic image of St Andrew’s Dock. Although the dock had closed ten years earlier there was still considerable business going as as the parked cars and vans indicate. The River Humber is on the far side of these buildings and the fence at right.

Only a single building still stands on the south side of the dock, and I think it is hidden by other buildings in this picture.


85-10k-25: St Andrew’s Dock, 1985 – Dock

19th November
A third view of St Andrew’s Dock, taken from a similar position at the north-west corner of the dock, but where I stepped back to include some of the rotting north dockside. The extension dock was to the right of this picture, with a channel at the south side leading through to it.

Hull’s ‘Billingsgate’ or Fish Market was formerly on the quayside here, but presumably moved with the trawlers to William Wright/Albert Dock in 1975. A new ‘state of the art’ market, ‘Fishgate’, was opened in 2001, but it sold mainly fish from the Icelandic fleet, and in 2011 they moved their sales to Grimsby.


85-10k-26: St Andrew’s Dock, 1985 – Dock

20th November
Another view of those curiously wrapped pillars which support the Clive Sullivan Way viaduct over the roundabout. The large striped shed in the background is still there on Brighton St in the Brighton St Industrial Estate, though there are now other buildings in front of it, and is or was part of the Birds Eye factory with the Norbert Dentressangle logo on it.


85-10k-55: Under Clive Sullivan Way, St Andrews Dock roundabout, 1985 – Docks

21st November

This rather distinctive industrial building was built in 1898 as Hull’s main tram depot when the city got permission for an electric tram system. It seems to have been built as a church to industry. After the trams stopped it was used by buses and then as a store by KHCT, known locally as the Ball Bearing or ‘Bolly’ Shed. Although still in good exterior condition when I photographed it, it later became derelict and a playground fro local kids and was eventually demolished and the whole area is now Asda.

In the background at left is a long factory building which again seems to have disappeared.


85-10k-62: Former City of Hull Tramways depot, Liverpool St, 1985 – Hessle Rd

22nd November

Hull corporation got permission from Parliament to construct and operated an electric tram system in 1896, and the first rail was ceremonially laid in June 1898. Siemens supplied the electrical equipment and the system used an unusual centre groove rail from Belgium. The Liverpool St depot in the pictures was built in 1898 as the main depot and workshop, and a number of the trams were built their until 1925. The first trams ran along Hessle Rd on July 5th, 1989 and they were replaced by trolleybuses between 1936 and 1945 and the building became a bus depot.

Over the years the name changed from City of Hull Tramways to Corporation Tramways in in 1919, then in 1931 to Hull Corporation Transport. In 1945, after the trams were replaced by buses it became Kingston upon Hull Corporation Transport, and finally in 1975 Kingston upon Hull City Transport or KHCT. The lack of any signage on this and the previous image suggests it might have been no longer in use when I took the photograph.


85-10k-63: Former City of Hull Tramways depot, Liverpool St, 1985 – Hessle Rd

23rd November

At the left is the newly built Clive Sullivan Way, named after his death in 1985, but built as the South Docks Road, and the road leading down to the roundabout at the end of Brighton St. These sidings used to lead to the docks but were retained when the area was redeveloped.

I think the large factory building just to the right of centre is still there on the Brighton St Industrial estate, but there are many more recent buildings around. Just one rail line remains and all the track on the right side has gone.


85-10k-65: Railway Sidings, near Brighton St, 1985 – Hessle Rd

24th November

Tower St is on the East side of the River Hull and now runs to The Deep, and the boats and buildings in this picture are all gone, except for the Tidal Barrier at top right of the image.

Hull is mainly built on land that was reclaimed from salt marsh, and around 90% of the city is below high tide level. The city is under threat from flooding both by the tide from the Humber and water from the River Hull and the water draining from its extensive catchment area. Various civil engineering works since medieval times have been carried out both to stop this flooding and drain the land for agricultural use, with lengthy drains discharging into the River Hull and the Humber, and banks built up along the river.

The tidal barrier, built in 1980, is lowered when exceptionally high tides are expected (though everyone in Hull believes that the first time after it was completed it was needed those responsible forgot to do so.) But at least since then it has protected the city, though it was a close thing in 2013, and some parts of the dockside flood walls were overtopped, and have now had a couple of feet added to them.

But Hull is still vulnerable to flooding from exceptional rainfall in the hinterland, and in 2007 8,600 homes and 13,000 businesses were flooded.


85-10l-12: Boats in yard and Tidal Barrier, Tower St, 1985 – River Hull


You can see the new pictures added each day at Hull Photos, and I post them with the short comments above on Facebook.
Comments and corrections to captions are welcome here or on Facebook.
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Hull Photos: 10/11/17 – 16/11/17

Tuesday, December 19th, 2017

Another digest of daily posts during Hull2017 on Facebook, about the pictures added daily on the intro page at Hull Photos. Comments and corrections to the captions and texts about the pictures are always welcome here or on Facebook.

Hull Photos

10th November

Another view of Bentleys Snowflake Laundry. The house at the right is number 78 and a few doors down from the laundry building is a terrace entry with a small shop on the nearer corner, but I failed to remember or identify the street. The address of Bentley’s laundry business was Plane St, though later it moved to more modern premises in Harrow St. Plane street is still largely intact and the houses in this picture are not the same.

The laundry site was a large one, and thanks to Pauline, Rimmmer, Wendy Woo, Lesley Gowen and others in the ‘Hulll The good old days’ Facebook group I can confirm that this warehouse was at 74-76 Greek St, just around the corner from the main entrance in Plane St. There are now two semis – 4 houses – where the laundry entrance was at 110-116 Plane St, with some behind in Bentley Court which is named after the works.

On Greek St the telephone post in this picture is still there, with a single fairly recent semi-detached house, No 74-6 exactly where the laundry building – evidently a warehouse where wash powder was kept – used to be, though the rest of that side of the street as far as Hawthorne Ave was an empty site when Google Steetview last went down there in 2015.


85-10j-56: Bentleys Snowflake Laundry, Greek St, 1985 – Hessle Rd

11th November

Another view of the sheds on the Hull Fair site in Walton St which were demolished in 2009, though the larger building beyond had gone earlier. The Hull telephone box is still there.


85-10j-62: Hull Fair Site, Walton St, 1985 – Argyle St

12th November

Underneath the Clive Sullivan Way (A63) at the roundabout leading to St Andrews Quay retail development, looking roughly west. There are now trees planted on the roundabout that obscure the view, but I think nothing visible in this picture other than the roads and the supporting columns (now without their plastic wrapping) is still standing.


85-10k-13: Under Clive Sullivan Way, St Andrews Dock roundabout, 1985 – Hessle Rd

13th November

The footpath from the end of Liverpool St led over a footbridge across the railway lines into the dock. . The Lord Line building, long allowed to rot but still there despite attempts to get permission for demolition, opposed by those who see it as representing an important part of Hull’s heritage is in the distance just to the right of the horse.


85-10k-15: Horse in Field, footpath to St Andrew’s Dock, 1985

14th November

G Stanley – Sail & Cover Co. and W Dukes Ship Riggers. Dukes was only incorporated in 1983, but had traded previously for a few months as Mendanengine Limited.

St Andrew’s Dock, originally planned for the coal trade became Hull’s Fish Dock when it opened in 1883 as the fishing industry was expanding rapidly with the introduction of steam trawlers and the rail network which could rapidly move the fish across the country. The expansion was so great that a dock extension was opened in 1897.

Road transport took over from rail, with the last fish train from Hull running in 1965. Fishing had a boom in the 1970s, and with larger trawlers and deteriorating buildings around the St Andrew’s Dock the fish docks moved to William Wright dock/Albert Dock, only for the industry to disappear with the cod wars. The dock extension was filled in to become a retail area, St Andrew’s Quay. In 1990 Hull Council declared the area around the entrance lock a conservation area but the area is still in limbo. Various schemes have been proposed for the development of the remaining dock area with a marina, an education campus, a heritage museum and more, but the remaining buildings have been allowed or encouraged to become derelict and unless the council takes some radical action are likely to be lost.


85-10k-21: St Andrew’s Dock, 1985 – Docks

15th November

At left is the St Andrew’s Dock Extension; an approach road at right leads up to Clive Sullivan Way. In the background the Humber Bridge stretches across most of the image.

85-10k22: St Andrews Dock Extension, Humber Bridge and Clive Sullivan Way, 1985 – Docks

16th November

The Humber St Andrew’s Engineering Co Ltd was incorporated in 1946 to take over the business of of Humber Shipwright Co. Ltd and the St. Andrews Engineering and Shipwright Co. Ltd. One of Hull’s trawler firms, Hellyer Bros. was the majority shareholder by the 1970s and the company became a a wholly owned subsidiary of their successor B.U.T (British United Trawlers) and closed in 1976.

Hellyer Bros had started in Brixham as Devon Fishing Company Ltd in the nineteenth century and moved up to Hull in the 1850s when large herring stocks were discovered in the North Sea. By the 1960s were the largest trawler company in Hull and probably the UK, with a reputation for being ruthless employers. They became a part of Associated Fisheries Ltd in 1961.


85-10k-23: Humber St Andrew’s Engineering Co Ltd, St Andrew’s Dock, 1985 – Docks


You can see the new pictures added each day until the end of Hull2017 at Hull Photos, and I post them with the short comments above on Facebook.
Comments and corrections to captions are welcome here or on Facebook.
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Hull Photos: 3/11/17 – 9/11/17

Thursday, December 7th, 2017

Still catching up with putting these weekly digests on line. You can keep up to date by following my daily posts on Facebook, and can of course see the pictures but not the texts on the intro page at Hull Photos. Comments and corrections to the captions and texts about the pictures are always welcome here or on Facebook.


3rd November

A group of three youngsters on bikes at the end of Essex St, with Cawoods (Fish Curers) smoke house behind them. They saw me taking pictures and were keen to have their picture taken. I’ve written more about Cawoods in earlier comments.


85-10j-26: Cawoods, Essex St, Gipsyville, 1985 – Hessle Rd

4th November

There is still an HB Motors in Hull, with a shop-front since around 2010 on Anlaby Rd, but these premises were a short distance away on Hawthorne Avenue, filling the area between the level crossing and Haddon St. This whole area has been extensively redeveloped this century.


85-10j-32: HB Motors, Haddon St/Hawthorn Ave, 1985 – Hessle Rd

5th November

Bentleys Snowflake Laundry was a family firm established in Hull in 1890, becoming a private limited company in 1917 and changing its name to Bentley’s Industrial Services Ltd in 1979. It became one of the UK’s leading commercial laundry companies. The company, at one time in Plane St, by 2005 had large works on Harrow St and 140 employees, was sold up then with its three divisions going separately to different laundry operators. Thanks to a number of people on the Facebook group ‘Hull: The Good Old Days’ who worked at or lived near the laundry I can confirm that this shed was on Greek St. The whole site, which had its main entrance on Plane St, was redeveloped as a small housing estate a few years after I took this picture.

Presumably the name was intended as a reference to their service making linen as white as snow, but they share their name with the man from Vermont, USA who dedicated much of his like to making photographic images of snowflakes, Wilson Alwyn “Snowflake” Bentley (1865-1931). Probably the first person to successfully photograph them, he made thousands of pictures which showed every snowflake to be different, and his work established the six-armed dendritic pattern which has become synonymous with our idea of snowflakes, though it is only one of possibly over 80 forms they take.


85-10j-42: Bentleys Snowflake Laundry, Greek St, 1985 – Hessle Rd

6th November

A shop door at No 95 almost certainly on Greek St, on the corner of Carlton Villas. The shop was closed, possibly for good and seemed rather in need of the repair which was stated to be its speciality. Most of this area was demolished around 2012, but few of the streets were long enough to have a No 95 on them.


85-10j-43: Repair A Speciality, Greek St, 1985 – Hessle Rd

7th November

This shop on the corner of Greek St and Hawthorne Avenue was not demolished until around 2013. A helpful street sign in the image makes it easy to locate.

There were extensive demolitions in the area as a part of a government backed ‘Gateway Pathfinder’ scheme, started in 2002. The Hull and East Riding Housing Market Renewal Pathfinder was the last of nine schemes to be granted funding, and by the end of 2009 had received £113m, and a scheme for a further £400m to be spent in West Hull had been approved in principle, but the scheme was ended by the coalition government and ended early in 2011, with considerable hardship for many who lived in the area.

The letters B, B, E, C on the wall were something of a mystery to me when I took this, but are the initial letters of items the shop sold, and there are very faint traces of other letters in a darker paint, though it requires a little guesswork. Going down vertically at left was I think BACON, while the larger sign was for BUTTER EGGS and CHEESE.


85-10j-46: Shop, corner of Greek St/Hawthorne Avenue, 1985 – Hessle Rd

8th November
These sheds on the Hull Fair site in Walton St were demolished in 2009.

Hull Fair is one of the largest travelling funfairs in Europe, and the largest in England and it comes to this site for 8 days around 11th October each year. The first charter for the fair was granted in 1278, but the city celebrated the 700th anniversary in 1993, probably for good historical reasons – or perhaps they just didn’t notice it fifteen years earlier. Back in 1294 the fair – largely a market – lasted 6 weeks. It moved to the present 16 acre site in 1888.


85-10j-52: Hull Fair Site, Walton St, 1985 – Argyle St

9th November

One of many small businesses in Hull, Modern Systems would appear to have seen better days. A smaller notice on the gate at left gives the name J A Drury ‘Building Joinery Plumbing Free Estimates’.

The photograph was taken on one of my long and often rambling walks in West Hull, probably somewhere between Anlaby Road and Hessle Rd, and this property has been demolished and I was not able to find any trace of it or the business on-line.

But posting it in the Facebook group Hull: The good old days, Liz Cook immediately came up with a suggestion that I could quickly confirm. This building was indeed on Arthur St, and I could recognise the row of houses whose backs are behind it as being on Plane St. There is still a lamp post in the same place (though a different post), but the business has been replaced by a more modern semi-detached house.

I photographed in Arthur St on at least one other occasion, and probably went down it because I knew it was the street where my father-in-law had grown up and lived, one of a large family of Hoults, around the time of the First World War. In June 1907, the Hull Coroner Colonel A. Thorney concluded at an inquest “Congestion the lungs consequent upon measles, was the cause of the death of the seventeen months old child of Mary Hoult, wife of a boilermaker, of 57, Arthur-street” and a verdict of death from natural causes was returned.


85-10j-55: Modern Systems Building Plumbing, Arthur St, 1985 – Hessle Rd


You can see the new pictures added each day at Hull Photos, and I post them with the short comments above on Facebook.
Comments and corrections to captions are welcome here or on Facebook.
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Hull Photos: 27/10/17 – 2/11/17

Sunday, December 3rd, 2017

Still trying to catch up with putting these weekly digests on line, but getting diverted by other things. You can keep up to date by following my daily posts on Facebook, and can of course see the pictures but not the texts on the intro page at Hull Photos. Comments and corrections to the captions and texts about the pictures are always welcome here or on Facebook.

27th October 2017

Another view of Wellington St – little had visibly changed since my previous picture two years earlier. Behind the wholesale fruit and vegetable sheds is one of Hull’s still existing smoke houses, though this one was apparently built for bacon rather than fish. It has recently been restored.


85-5k-32: Fruit Brokers and Smoke House, Wellington St, 1985 – Old Town

28th October 2017

It was a busy high tide at the mouth of the River Hull, with Newdale H going upstream and through the Myton Bridge which opened for it, and a grab dredger operating at the mouth of the river (on the left in this picture) and then watching as a tug turned the trailing suction hopper dredger Bowstream around in the River Humber at the mouth of the Hull and then towing it into the Old Harbour where it berthed on the east side.


85-5k-45: Bowstream being towed into the Old Harbour, 1985 – River Hull

29th October 2017

A man pushes his bicycle along the pavement on Subway St, off the Hessle Rd. His bike is loaded with lengths of old piping, probably reclaimed from houses in the area awaiting demolition and he is presumably taking them to a scrap merchant. The houses here are all soon to be demolished, along with R E Powell, who will no longer be selling fish here.

It’s hard to place this exactly on Subway St, as there are few clues, though the distant view of Hessle Rd is clear. Powell’s could be on the corner of St Andrew St, which no longer exists. At the right of the picture is the corner of a fish smoke house, and there is still one in Subway St, but I think that is further south from Hessle Rd, and the one on the edge of this picture I think is one that has been demolished. More of it can be seen in the next two pictures I will post.


85-5l-44: Subway St, 1985 – Hessle Rd

30th October 2017

A fish smoke house, I think in West Dock Avenue, seen from Subway St. So much in this area has been demolished that it is very difficult to find exact locations for these pictures. This was taken just a few feet away from the previous image, and the brick wall at left is on the right of that picture, with the side of the smoke house.


85-5l-45: Fish Smoke House from Subway St, 1985 – Hessle Rd

31st October 2017

Another view of the back of the site with a fish smoke house taken from an empty plot on Subway St


85-5l-46: Fish Smoke House from Subway St, 1985 – Hessle Rd

1st November 2017

A view alongside the Fish Dock entrance lock. Although St Andrews Dock had closed there were still a few offices open here as well as by the end of William Wright Dock which was now the fish dock, with cars parked here – and there is still a fluorescent light on inside Humberside Driver Training Services Ltd, part of C E A Towne (Ship Riggers) Ltd.


85-5l-56: St Andrew’s Dock, 1985 – Docks

2nd November 2017

Yet another dredger – the Grab Hopper Dredger Redcliffe Sand moored in William Wright Dock. 1424 tons and built in 1964 by C. Hill in Bristol for British Transport Docks Board, she was sold by Associated British Ports in 1989 and after several owners was renamed Ribel in 1992/3 and scrapped as a total loss in 1996 in Beirolas, Lisbon.

William Wright Dock, at the west end of Albert Dock, had become Hull’s fish dock in 1975 when the neighbouring St Andrew’s Dock closed. The rather ancient-looking wooden Hull telephone box had clearly seen better days but I think was still in working order.


85-5l-65: William Wright Dock, 1985 – Docks


You can see the new pictures added each day at Hull Photos, and I post them with the short comments above on Facebook.
Comments and corrections to captions are welcome here or on Facebook.
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Hull Photos: 20/10/17 – 26/10/17

Wednesday, November 29th, 2017

Another week of my daily postings to Hull Photos which are continuing through all of Hull’s 2017 year as UK City of Culture. You can follow them daily where each picture appears, but the pictures appear with comments on Facebook – and in the weekly digests here.

Comments and corrections are welcome here or on Facebook.

20th October 2017

A second picture of Ellerman’s House at the end of Bishop Lane Staithe taken from just a few yards further down the riverside path shows the river frontage of this building, converted to flats around 2000. The shed bridging over the path and overhanging the river in this picture has now gone, though there is a faint echo in some cantilevered balconies on the converted building. Also gone is the Clarence Flour Mill in the background, and the barges, with only the museum trawler Arctic Corsair moored a little upstream from here.

The listed buildings on the north side of Bishop’s Lane Staith were for some years the Ellerman’s Wilson Line Bishops Warehouse (listed Grade II, “Former warehouse, now flats. 1655, rebuilt c1800, converted c2000”). John Ellerman from Hull was a man noted for being unnoticed, highly secretive and shunning all publicity, but he was made a baron in 1905 for supplying ships to the government during the Boer War. He became Britain’s richest man, leaving over over £36 million, mainly to his son, when he died in 1933.

John Ellerman was born at 100 Anlaby Rd in 1862, but moved away from the city. He started his shipping company in 1892 when with two others he bought 22 vessels from the executors of the Liverpool-based shipping firm Frederick Leyland and Co Ltd. The company expanded through a series of acquisitions and became Ellerman Lines in 1903, with offices in Liverpool, Glasgow and London, becoming the world’s larges shipping company. During the First World War, Ellerman, then the wealthiest man in Britain, bought the Wilson Line of Hull for about £4.3m after the Wilson family had been devastated by the sinking of three of its largest vessels and renamed it Ellerman’s Wilson Line. It continued to trade seperately until 1973. Despite this, Ellerman remains almost unknown in Hull, and doesn’t even rate a mention in the most detailed book on the history of the city.

In 1971, The founder’s son, also John Ellerman gave the funds from Ellerman Lines to set up a charitable foundation, the Ellerman Foundation, which supported Hull’s 2017 City of Culture programme with a grant of £200,000 to Hull Truck Theatre Company.


85-5j-36: Ellerman’s House & River Hull, 1985 River Hull

More about Ellerman.

21th October 2017

A similar tank to this still stands on the corner of Hodgson St and Lime St, part of the bulk storage facility of IBL Bulk Liquids, though while the ladder still looks the same, the skin of the tank is now different. IBL was formed in Hull in 1947.


85-5j-41: Shadow on bulk storage tank, Lime St, 1985 – River Hull

22nd October 2017

Another picture of one of the few remaining old houses in the area close to Wincolmlee, Victoria House, built around 1840 and still standing.

The ornate entrance into the yard, described in the Grade II listing text written 9 years after I made this picture as “wooden doorcase with enriched scroll bracket to cornice and panelled recess with C20 door” is now gone, with just a faint trace in in the brickwork as a reminder of its loss. When I took this picture the building was in use by a printing firm.


85-5j-61: Victoria House, Cooper St, 1985 – River Hull

23rd October 2017

The padlocked door to this building with the IN boldly marked also less clearly has a Champion spark plug logo, which clearly suggests the nature of the business which went on, or once went on, inside. The empty hole in the upper floor perhaps suggests the building was no longer in use, and I think it has since been demolished as I can no longer see it in the area. It was the next picture I took after the previous image on Cooper St and the frame after shows Paul’s granary on Wincolmlee, but my walks often wandered considerably

Perhaps what made me stop and take a picture was the twin four rod aerial, which I don’t recall having seen elsewhere, perhaps for CB or Ham radio or could it be for a taxi service? I hope someone can tell me more.


85-5j-62: Industrial premises, Green Lane/Wincolmlee area, 1984 – River Hull

24th October 2017

The road side of Paul’s riverside granary building next to Scott St Bridge, with a regular pattern of reinforcements and bricked up windows.

The raised pavement here is presumably because of frequent flooding on the low-lying road. The Cottingham Drain, now culverted, entered the River Hull a few yards off the left edge of the picture. Just a few yards further on is also the Beverley & Barmston Drain. The area is known as ‘High Flags‘, said to be because of the large flagstones of a wharf used for handling whale oil, but perhaps because of this raised path beside the road. High Flags Mill is a little further upstream, on the bank of the River Hull a little north of the ‘Barmy’ drain.


85-5j-63: Bricked up windows on Granary, Wincolmlee, 1985 – River Hull

25th October 2017

A more than usually artistic spray paint addition to the wall and porcelain of the urinal, with a undoubtedly female figure facing the male member of the user of the facility.

Hull had a large number of these street urinals, simple enclosures with tall walls and no roof, around the city, and they remained well-used both by workers during the day and by drinkers at night, when it wasn’t unusual for their to be a queue snaking outside some of the more popular locations. It isn’t entirely clear why the council decided they were no longer required, and their removal certainly led to a huge rise in men urinating in the streets at night. Public conveniences across the country were shut down around this time in a huge wave of anti-gay sentiment, and the provision of these male-only locations led to a demand by some for their closure rather than the more logical provision of new facilities for women.

As a then undiagnosed diabetic who spent long hours wandering the streets I felt their loss sometimes rather keenly. You can still see the traces of this structure with some glazed bricks in the wall and lying on the ground beside it overlooking the River Hull, and a little angle of brickwork provides some slight privacy for those still using it for its former purpose.


85-5j-64: Scott St Urinal, 1985 – River Hull

26th October 2017

A smokehouse with 15 chimneys along its peak must be one of the finest examples of the type in Hull. Although it is still standing it has been considerably altered and all the chimneys have gone.

Despite their significance in the history of the city, none of the nine existing buildings on the local list has been given national listing – something that would certainly have been appropriate as a part of the celebrations of Hull2017.


85-5k-14: Fish Smokehouses, Subway St, 1985 – Hessle Rd


You can see the new pictures added each day at Hull Photos, and I post them with the short comments above on Facebook.
Comments and corrections to captions are welcome here or on Facebook.
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Hull Photos: 13/10/17 – 19/10/17

Friday, November 17th, 2017

Another weekly digest of the pictures I’m putting up every day on my Hull Photos web site where you can see a new picture every day. I also post them on my Facebook page, along with the short texts shown here, which are not yet included on the web site.

Comments and corrections are welcome either here or on Facebook, and will help me to get the finished texts which will eventually go on Hull Photos. Hull photos is divided into a number of sections, and the picture captions end with the name of the section that image has been placed in. Clicking any of the images will take you to it in that section of the site where you may find related images.

12th October 2017

A young man smiles as I take a picture of him sitting on his horse-drawn cart on Bridlington Avenue in front of the works of Rose Downs and Thompson Ltd.

I’ve written earlier about Rose Downs and Thompson Ltd, iron-founders and manufacturers of oil mill and hydraulic machinery, and their pioneering work in the UK building their listed 1900 factory extension (not in this picture) and the bridge on Cleveland St using the Hennebique ‘ferro-concrete’ system.


85-5i-21: Rag and Bone man, Bridlington Av, 1985 – Beverley Rd

13th October 2017

Shakespeare TV and Electronics was the place to go to buy a reconditioned TV, or for repairs, and they advertised their shop at 177 Springbank with the front of a TV on the fascia board.

This and the adjoining shop had some fancy decoration around their first floor windows, though a redundant strip of angle iron didn’t add to the effect. The shop is now a multicultral food store.


85-5i-41: Shakespeare TV and Electronics, Springbank, 1985 – Springbank

14th October 2017

Myrtle Villas, off Springbank roughly opposite Stanley St, was surely one of Hull’s shortest terraces, with only two houses on each side. But it did have its own Hull telephone box.

The houses across the end were being demolished when I took this picture, and the terrace now looks less enclosed and leads to further properties. The discount store on the right is now ‘Grab A Bargain’ and on the left is ‘Urban Trendz’. There is still a phone box, though I might have to wait a long time to see anyone using it, while back in the 1980s queues were not unusual.


85-5i-42: Myrtle Villas, Springbank, 1985 – Springbank

15th October 2017

Demolition was happening on a large scale in the area between Springbank and Beverley Rd and I took seven pictures. This image is unusual in that the demolition has cut through a long stretch of tightly packed houses and has left what appears to be a massive pile of bricks – and at bottom left a pile of old newspapers with the ‘Property Guide’ at the top.


85-5i-46: Demolition, Springbank area, 1985 – Springbank

16th October 2017

The decoration on the side of a former fire-station in Hall St now has a Hull Heritage Blue plaque stating it to have been the home of the Hull Volunteer Fire Brigade. There two wider doorways, slightly differing in size, one perhaps for the fire engine, and the other for the hroses that would have pulled it. That on the left is decorated with three horses heads and the other with images of three fire captains in their helmets, one at each side of the arch and the third on the keystone. The right hand arch also has a decorative pattern in the brickwork of the arch and small windows across the doors.

I made two exposures on this occasion, one showing the whole of the right hand gate and two of the horses heads on the left, and the second moving in closer to show just one of the horses and a man apparently looking up slightly towards it.

There was no plaque when I took my pictures, but it looked as if the building had been recently painted with the decorative figures picked out in white, slightly carelessly as there is some paint on the brickwork around. It looks as if the paintwork was a pale colour when I took these pictures, perhaps cream; later they were painted maroon and in 2008 repainted a dark blue.


85-5i-54: Hull Volunteer Fire Brigade building, Hall St, 1985 – Springbank

17th October 2017

The empty open box on the wall has a hook which probably once held a lifebelt and a cast-iron covered structure projects out over the riverside pathway and overhangs the river above a covered barge. The river seems full of vessels, but the only easily identifiable one is the barge Poem 21.

In the background across the river is Clarence Mill and the former Trinity House buoy shed. On the large heaps of sand at the wharf at right is the tiny figure of a man with a shovel, apparently facing an immense task.

The picture is taken from the end of Bishop Lane Staith and the Grade II listed building here is Ellerman’s Building, 38b High St, converted into flats in 2000. Out of site on the west side of the building is a stone with ‘G G M 1655’ which was retained from a former building on the site when this warehouse was rebuilt around 1800.


85-5j-21: Riverside path and loading bay, Old Harbour, 1985 – River Hull

18th October 2017

Kingston Supply Services was on Lime St on part of the site which is now a 24 hour car park next to L A Hall Roofing Contractors and Merchants. The building was demolished around 2010. The peeling sign once offered – among other indecipherable things – Pullovers, Blouses and Denim.

Some years earlier there had been a board a few yards down the street for Hull Ships Stores and this building may have been a part of this.


85-5j-31: Kingston Supply Services, Lime St, 1985 – River Hull

19th October 2017

At left are the buildings of Associated Tyre Specialists, still present with a frontage to Great Union St, now occupied by Adams Fast Food Supplies. Beyond them the buildings of Clarence Mill; those on this side of Drypool Bridge still standing and occupied by Shotwell, with the larger complex behind with ‘Clarence Flour Mills’ on its side sadly (and insanely) destroyed. The tanks and other objects blocking the riverside path are in front of the Union Dry Dock and at the right of the picture is the entrance to another dry dock, with a large shed of the Yorkshire Dry Dock Company to its right, between it and the former Queen’s dock entrance.

Burcom Sand, named after a sandbank in the Humber estuary between Grimsby and Sunk Island was a grab hopper dredger built in 1954 by Cook, Welton & Gemmell at Beverley which worked extensively for the British Transport Docks Board around the Hull docks in the 1960s and 70s. Later, like the Kenfig I also photographed here, she was owned by Dave Cook of Hull and used for jobs like removing old jetties. She was apparently fixed at the bow to piles at low tide with a wire hawser and pulled them up and out as she rose with the tide. She was broken up across the Humber at New Holland in March 1994.


85-5j-33: Burcom Sand moored above Drypool Bridge, 1985 – River Hull


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Hull Photos: 6/10/17 – 12/10/17

Thursday, November 9th, 2017

Another week of pictures added to my Hull Photos site – one per pay throughout Hull’s year as 2017 UK City of Culture. You can follow these daily on Facebook – and of course on the Hull Photos site, though the comments do not appear there – I hope to get comments and corrections to them before adding them. Your comments are welcome here or on Facebook.

6th October 2017

Rix tanker Beldale H, here backing further into the Drypool Basin entrance swinging area. Small tankers such as this transferred oil for large vessels in the King George V dock or other ports along the Humber Estuary or through Goole.

Beldale H, a 300 ton estuary and inland waterway barge was built by Harkers in Knottingley in 1959 and was later renamed Rix Osprey. Rix is a family firm begun by Captain Robert Rix; born on a farm in Norfolk in 1841, he ran away to sea when he was 10, later becoming a captain and setting up a shipbuilding company on the Tees in Newcastle in 1873. Ten years later he moved with his wife and seven children to Hull, where he continued to work for the firm until the day before his death in 1925. The firm developed to have wide interests in trade of lamp oil from Russia and later oil for tractors, heating etc, as well as shipping timber in and caravans out of Hull, agricultural distribution, haulage and more. As well as the Rix Petroleum site with a wharf on the River Hull and storage across Wincolmlee, from 1977 to 2012 they also owned Hepworth Shipyard Ltd at Paull a few miles down the Humber north bank.

The best-known member of the family, Brian Rix (1924-2016) noted for having trouble keeping his trousers up on stage, but also a notable campaigner on learning disability both before and after entering the House of Lords was a grandson of Robert Rix. Knighted for services to charity in 1986 he became a life peer in 1992.


85-5h-35: Beldale H at Drypool entrance swinging area, 1985 – River Hull

5th October 2017

By 1985, this shop had abandoned its earlier Royal Wedding window display I had photographed in 1981 and was back to basics – 4 toilet rolls for 52 p and cans of soft drinks.


85-5h-41: Shop window display, Church St, 1985 – East Hull

7th October 2017

Somewhere on – or just off – the Holderness Rd was a used car dealer with this peeling message on a window.


85-5h-53: Cars and Vans Bought for Cash, Holderness Rd, 1985 – East Hull

8th October 2017

Just a few yards down a street leading off from Holderness Rd was an unusual display of rectangles – empty notices, blocked windows and doors, some bricked up and ventilation. And just one message: “Victory to the miners”. Their strike had ended in defeat two months earlier


85-5h-54: Victory to the miners, Holderness Rd, 1985 – East Hull

9th October 2017

This rather unusual complex of interlocking buildings were on Church St, on the south side of the road just to the west of end of the road at the junction with Naylor’s Row/Marvel St and Strawberry St.

The site is just to the west of Paling Joiners, roughly opposite East St and I think the larger building at the back of the picture is possibly still there, perhaps with some alteration (or replaced by a similar building), though the rest has gone, and a thick hedge obscures the view.

The white building in the distance is the Kingston Arms, though rather closer to me just out of picture is The Blacksmith’s Arms, now closed and put up for auction last year as “a fantastic development opportunity.”


85-5h-55: Industrial site, Holderness Rd area, 1985 – East Hull

10th October 2017

Hull had many windmills in earlier years and around 30 are listed within the city boundary on Wikipedia, though most were demolished before the start of the 20th century. This mill appears twice on the list there and is, so far as I’m aware, the only one that remains in Hull, as The Mill public house on Holderness Rd, opposite East Park. There are of course quite a few in the surrounding area, including one at Skidby, said to be the last working mill in East Yorkshire.

This mill was restored in the late 20th century and is a Grade II listed building, as too is the public house, The Mill, adjoining it. It now has a cap and sails.

The mill had been disused for many years. A 1928 photograph shows it in a similar condition to my picture with a large advert for the Hull Daily Mail painted on it and a board for the business premises of W Lockwood in front of it. It could be the same board as was there when I took my picture but the name had change and now ended in OWEN with telephone number 783516. The remains of several advertising messages are dimly visible, one perhaps for a brand of Stout, and in front of the image are a number of blank headstones in what was presumably the yard of an monumental mason.


85-5h-64: Windmill, Holderness Rd – East Hull

11th October 2017

Carr St, off Scott St, was demolished to provide further parking for the Maizecor mill on Wincolmlee, although a downturn in business probably meant it was never needed. The building at right is the Scott Street Methodist Chapel of 1804, from around 1910 the printing works of Mason & Jackson Ltd, and at the centre of the image, along what had once been Marsh St were the buildings of the Sculcoates Relief Office.

The story of this chapel and the failure of attempts to get it listed in the 1990s are told by Paul Gibson and the buildings were all demolished in 2001. The extended lorry park this provided was always more or less empty when I went past.


85-5i-14: Carr St, 1985 – River Hull

12th October 2017

A young man smiles as I take a picture of him sitting on his horse-drawn cart on Bridlington Avenue in front of the works of Rose Downs and Thompson Ltd.

I’ve written earlier about Rose Downs and Thompson Ltd, iron-founders and manufacturers of oil mill and hydraulic machinery, and their pioneering work in the UK building their listed 1900 factory extension (not in this picture) and the bridge on Cleveland St using the Hennebique ‘ferro-concrete’ system.


85-5i-21: Rag and Bone man, Bridlington Ave, 1985 – Beverley Rd


You can see the new pictures added each day at Hull Photos, and I post them with the short comments above on Facebook.

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Hull Photos: 29/9/17 – 5/10/17

Thursday, November 2nd, 2017

Another week of my daily postings to Hull Photos which are continuing through all of Hull’s 2017 year as UK City of Culture. You can follow them daily where each picture appears, but the pictures appear with comments on Facebook – and in the weekly digests here.

Comments and corrections are welcome here or on Facebook.

29th September 2017

Taken from Scott St Bridge, this shows one of the older industrial buildings along the River Hull, Paul’s riverbank Granary building, linked on its other side across Wincolmlee to the rest of the mill complex. At the extreme left you can see the bell used to warn of the bridge lifting, in front of the windows of the Paul’s bilding across Wincolmlee.

The local listing describes it as “Characteristic and increasingly rare historic riverside building. Important for illustrating the history of Hull’s development as a port in the 19th century. Extant in 1853 and pictured in a F. S. Smith drawing of 1888. Distinctive early 20th century iron covered overhead footbridge linking the former granary to the mill across the road has attractive decorative roundels in the wrought iron brackets at either side.”


85-5g-66: Granary, R & W Paul, Scott St/River Hull, 1985 – River Hull

30th September 2017

The River Hull is relatively narrow, even at high tide, and larger boats are unable to turn above Drypool Bridge. The swinging area just below Rank’s Clarence Mill was the former entrance to Drypool Basin which led from the River into Victoria Dock.

The Beldale H which I had photographed before going upstream towards Rix’s wharf a short distance below Wilmington Rail Bridge had made its way backwards down the Hull much higher in the water and I took a series of eight images as it swung around to go forwards towards the Humber.

The Northern Divers (ENG) Ltd building is still in Tower St, though the company moved to Sutton Fields in 2011. The 1901 building designed by David Christie, is a Grade II-listed former Trinity House buoy shed. Its distinctive tubular crane can just be seen behind a more conventional one; it predates the building having been originally installed at Princes Dock in 1861 and is possibly the only remaining example of its kind, and is separately listed as follows:

“Tubular Crane. c1865, resited 1901. Cast iron. Curved tubular cast iron jib which turns through 360 degrees. Original gearing and later electric motor at base. Sunk into circular hole in the quayside, with deep straight counter weight secured to base of quayside.”

This type of crane was designed and patented by William Fairburn in 1850 and constructed by various manufacturers.


85-5h-22: Beldale H at Drypool entrance swinging area, 1985 – River Hull

1st October 2017

Behind the Beldale H swinging out from the Drypool Basin entrance the large vessel is the 1424 gross ton suction dredger Bowstream, since 1996 known as the Porto Novo surprisingly still apparently in service, currently in Funchal, Madeira. Built in 1971 in the Netherlands as an effluent tanker and named Hudson Stream, she was sold to British Dredging Ltd of Cardiff in 1972 and converted to a suction dredger and renamed Bowstream the following year.


85-5h-23: Beldale H at Drypool entrance swinging area, 1985 – River Hull

2nd October 2017

When the new east dock (renamed Victoria Dock in 1850) was built in 1845-50, the plans included an entrance from both the River Humber and the River Hull. The entrance from the Hull led into Drypool Basin, with a further lock leading to Victoria Dock, and there was a similar arrangement but with twin locks (one larger with a smaller one alongside for barges) into the Half-Tide Basin from the Humber. The entrance from the Old Harbour on the RIver Hull was only completed a couple of years after the dock opened in around 1852.

When Victoria Dock closed in 1973, it was filled in east of Tower St, including the Drypool Basin (though much of the dock area was timber yards rather than water, with the timber ponds having previously been filled) and few traces other than the Half-Tide Basin remain in the Victoria Dock estate. The entrance to the Drypool Basin was retained as far as Tower St, as an essential swinging area allowing longer vessels on the Hull to turn around in the Old Harbour.

Tower St at the left of the picture is roughly where the outer lock gate was (previously a swing bridge had carried it across the centre of the lock), and a vertical stone on the river wall separates the lock entrance from the curved wall of the swinging area. The large board fixed on the building on the right at a slight angle names this as the Swinging Area and prohibits mooring, though the details are too small to read on the full-size image.

The building at the right is still there, though a little hidden, but that at the centre and left has gone. The 1928 large-scale OS map calls it ‘Pumping Station’ and the tower appears to be part of the hydraulic power system that was used in the docks. It’s replacement is considerably less attractive.


85-5h-24: Erdmann Ltd, Welders & Fabricators, Tower St and Swinging Area, 1985 – River Hull

3rd October 2017

The Drypool Bridge is raised for the small Rix tanker Bledale H to reverse through underneath, though it looks as if there might have been sufficient clearance without it opening, but the water is fairly high close to high tide.

The photograph is taken from the riverside path underneath Joseph Rank’s Clarence Mill, where another small vessel, possibly an oil tanker, is moored with crew on board.

In one of the more senseless acts of recent years in Hull, the Clarence Mill, an iconic local landmark, was recently demolished, and the site has lain empty for several years. It was meant to house a new hotel for Hull2017 Year of Culture, but not a stone on the site was turned and it seems that this was simply used as a pretext to gain permission to demolish one of Hull’s best-known and loved buildings.

It had little claim to architectural merit, having been largely rebuilt after wartime destruction, but was an important monument to one of Hull’s great men who changed the milling industry and was of some interest in terms of industrial archaeology. It appeared to be in sound condition and could almost certainly have been repurposed without losing its character, or at the very least some of the riverside elements should have been incorporated into any new development.

On the other side of the river just above the bridge is a block of warehouses, demolished in the late 1980s, another sad and unnecessary loss to Hull’s heritage. Again the site has since remained empty, used only for car parking.


85-5h-31: Drypool Bridge and River Hull, 1985 – River Hull

4th October 2017

Another picture of Rix tanker Beldale H, here moving stern first into the Drypool Basin entrance swinging area. At right is the Grade II listed Pease Warehouse, then recently converted into flats.

Although there are still quite a few barges moored on the west side of the river at the High St wharves, there is now quite a long empty gap.


85-5h-34: Beldale H at Drypool entrance swinging area, 1985 – River Hull

5th October 2017

By 1985, this shop had abandoned its earlier Royal Wedding window display I had photographed in 1981 and was back to basics – 4 toilet rolls for 52 p and cans of soft drinks.


85-5h-41: Shop window display, Church St, 1985 – East Hull


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Hull Photos: 22/9/17 – 28/9/17

Tuesday, October 24th, 2017

Another week of Hull photos and comments. You can see the new pictures every day on Hull Photos or better on Facebook, where these comments also appear.

Comments on the images welcomed here or on Facebook.

22nd September 2017

A man walks his dog in front of rubble from demolition. In the background at left is the rear of Stepney Primary School, and to its right the rear of the baths and a rather small and undistinguished chimney which still stands. The larger chimney to the right, also seen in the previous picture may have been a part of the Beverley Rd Baths.

The Cottingham Drain, culverted some years before I took this picture, ran behind the school and baths, close to where this picture was taken.


85-5g-25: Man and dog, Epworth St area, 1985 – Beverley Rd

23rd September 2017

Taken from the embankment of the former Hull and Barnsley railway close to Bridlington Avenue this view has a wide sweep of Hull industry in the background, with Reckitt’s chimney and the British Extracting Co silo. But dominating the middle ground are the Grade II listed Northumberland Avenue Almshouses, built in 1884-87 for the Hull Charity Trustees by architects Richard George Smith & Frederick Stead Brodrick of Hull in a domestic Tudor revival style.

According to the Victoria County History at British History Online these new almshouses replaced nine existing ‘Municipal Hospitals’, Crowle’s, Ellis’s, Gee’s, Gregg’s, Harrison’s and Fox’s, Lister’s, Watson’s, and Weaver’s Hospitals. The new almshouses cost £15,000 and took in 114 inmates from the old hospitals.

Northumberland Court is still run by Hull United Charities and is a category 2 sheltered housing scheme for persons over the age of 55, and is now 58 modernised self-contained flats. The site also includes Richardson Court which also provides sheltered housing.


85-5g-42: Beverley & Barmston Drain, allotments & Northumberland Court, 1985 – Beverley Rd

24th September 2017

From the same viewpoint as the previous image, a telephoto view of the Grade II listed Northumberland Avenue Almshouses shows more clearly the work of Smith & Brodrick. In Yorkshire: York and the East Riding, Nikolaus Pevsner and David Neave state they “had the largest (architectural) practice in East Yorkshire, but their work is of mixed quality, with the more distinctive buildings from the late 1870s suggesting the influence of Norman Shaw and the Queen Anne style.” The building is certainly impressive – if not to everyone’s taste – and despite its large overall size gives the feeling of domesticity, essentially a long terrace of smaller houses, with the added accent of the clock tower.

Two of Hull’s other listed buildings appear behind it, the British Extracting Co Ltd silo with its water tower with a puzzling logo, and just visible right of centre close to a metal chimney, the control room on top of the Wilmington Railway Swing Bridge.


85-5g-43: Northumberland Avenue Almshouses from the Hull & Barnsley embankment, 1985 – Beverley Rd


25th September 2017

Robert Paul (1806-1864) founded Pauls Malt Ltd in Ipswich around 1842, after the family business with a small brewery and its 15 public houses, a saddlery and an ironmongers had been sold up. The business which at his death had 11 small maltings and six barges, passed to a trust until his two sons, Robert Stocker (1845-1909) and William Francis (1850-1928) reached the age of 24. Under them and with financial help from Robert’s father-in-law the business prospered and diversified into animal feedstuffs flaked maize and shipping, and in 1893 became a private limited company, R & W Paul Ltd. The company purchased a number of other companies in London, Lincolnshire, Norfolk and in 1918, the Hull Malt Company, converting their works to mill animal feeds. Expansion continued with other company purchases and in 1960 the company became public and acquisitions and mergers continued, with the company investing in Belgium, France and Germany.

But the 1979 recession hit the company hard, and shortly before I took this picture the company was acquired by Harrisons and Crosfield, though George Paul, the great great grandson of the founder remained as chief executive Two year later Paul’s took over their major competitor Associated British Maltsters to become the largest maltsters in Europe, but in 1998 Harrisons and Crosfield sold Paul’s to the Irish-based Greencore.

Maizecor Foods Limited appear to have taken over the business and their registered office moved to this address around 1998. Since then the business has had a number of crises, but has managed to continue.

Scott St Bridge was unfortunately closed to traffic in 1994 and has been permanently raised since then, and looks as if it is being deliberately allowed to deteriorate by Hull Council. The council tried unsuccessfully to get permission to demolish this listed building a few years ago but were refused permission by the Government in 2012. Many in Hull would like to see it kept as a part of the city’s heritage and reopened if only as a useful cycle and pedestrian route.


85-5g-51: R & W Paul silo from Scott St Bridge, 1985 – River Hull

26th September 2017

The two buildings closest to the camera on opposite banks of the river are still standing but the other riverside buildings visible here on Wincolmlee have been demolished and the ground stands empty and unused.

The vessel proceeding upriver is the small RIX tanker Beldale H, loaded and fairly deep in the water.

Moored at right is the Krystle, a small 380 tons gross general cargo ship built in Appingedam in the Nethrlands in 1961 which over her lifetime had a succession of names, Visserbank, Aegean Eind, Rene S, and Trio before becoming Krystle from 1985-8 and ending her life as Michelle. She was last recorded at San Lorenzo in 1995 sailing under a Honduran flag and has almost certainly since been lost or broken up.


85-5g-52: River Hull, downstream from Scott St Bridge, 1985 – River Hull

27th September 2017

The name on the bridge across Wincolmlee has changed to Maizecor, the windows on the ground floor of the silo have disappeared, though you can still see the ghosts of their presence. There is now a metal security shutter in place of the gated entrance, and the top right window of the brick building has been bricked up but the differences are relatively minor. The lamp post in the foreground is still there, though the actual light fitting has disappeared.

The big difference is out of picture to the right, where the bascules of Scott St Bridge are now locked near vertical, the bridge closed to the road since 1994. The now redundant 10 tonnes weight limit sign has gone, though there are now newer equally unneeded 6’6″ width restriction signs on both sides of the vestigial street leading up to the up-ended roadway, as well as some sturdy black and white striped posts to enforce that limit.

Further down Wincolmlee the public footpath sign as gone, though the path is still there, and three trees above the former Cottingham Drain it runs beside restrict the view of W & J Oliver Engineers and Smiths (now ‘stead engineering’) and the premises beyond.


85-5g-53: Wincolmlee and Scott St bridge approach, 1985 – River Hull

28th September 2017

This rather empty yard is now occupied by John Brocklesby Metal Management at 92-96 Lime St, and both the brick building at right and that in the background at the centre of the picture are still there. Whether any of the building at left is hidden beneath metal cladding on the large metal shed now on the site is hard to tell, though I think not.

The low wall at the end of the yard is the river wall, and the more distant building is on the other side of the River Hull, the more northerly of two large mills at around 196 Wincolmlee, the Grade II listed High Flags Mill.


85-5g-62: High Flags Mill from Lime St, 1985 – River Hull

29th September 2017

Taken from Scott St Bridge, this shows one of the older industrial buildings along the River Hull, Paul’s riverbank Granary building, linked on its other side across Wincolmlee to the rest of the mill complex. At the extreme left you can see the bell used to warn of the bridge lifting, in front of the windows of the Paul’s building across Wincolmlee.

The local listing describes it as “Characteristic and increasingly rare historic riverside building. Important for illustrating the history of Hull’s development as a port in the 19th century. Extant in 1853 and pictured in a F. S. Smith drawing of 1888. Distinctive early 20th century iron covered overhead footbridge linking the former granary to the mill across the road has attractive decorative roundels in the wrought iron brackets at either side.”


85-5g-66: Granary, R & W Paul, Scott St/River Hull, 1985 – River Hull


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Hull Photos: 15/9/17 – 21/9/17

Thursday, October 19th, 2017

Another week of the daily posts on Hull Photos of images I made in the 1980s. You can see the new pictures every day on the main menu page, but it’s better to follow my posts on Facebook, where you will also see the comments I make on the pictures, and can comment on them.

Comments on the pictures are also welcome here.

15th September 2017

Taken on Wincolmee just a few yards south of the junction with Green Lane and Lincoln St this image incorporates the reflection in the window, the machinery – I think for sale – within and also a view out through the window around the side. This building is still there but the side window has been bricked up.

But most of the view is straightforward and past the roundabout shows the buildings at the junction of Lincoln St and Wincolmlee, looking roughly north. These are still recognisable, and the Whalebone Inn is still open though it has lost the hanging sign and is under different ownership. The site at the right, with a notice for a seed crushing company is now empty.


84-4k-51: Wincolmlee, Green Lane, Lincoln St roundabout, 1984 – River Hull

16th September 2017

This structure, I think a large panel in front of a bulk oil storage tanks, at one of the wharves on Wincolmlee fascinated me and I photographed it on several occasions, both in black and white and in colour.

The way the different panels caught the light and their diamond shapes, the vertical ladder with its horizontal rungs and the various rectangular and circular accents all seduced my attention.

But I do have a nagging feeling that this is perhaps more of a design exercise than a real photograph of Hull.


84-4k-52: Wincolmlee, 1984 – River Hull

17th September 2017

Conveniently both street names are visible in this view take from just inside St Mary’s Burial Ground, on the corner of Air St and Bankside.

Sculcoates by the 1820s had grown from from a population of around a hundred to over 10,000 and the old St Mary Sculcoates which had existed since 1232 or earlier was replaced in 1760 by “a very handsome structure, with a square tower of white brick and Roche Abbey stone, in the pointed style of the time of Henry IV” with seating for 1300 people on the corner of Air St and Bankside. You can see it in a print on the Hull Museums site.

The two pillars in this picture are the lower parts of the gate posts of the 1760 church which was ‘improved’ in 1875 at a cost of £1000 and then demolished in 1916. A new St Mary Sculcoates was built a few hundred yards to the west on Sculcoates lane and is still in use. That church is open on Heritage Open days, but all that remains of the 1760 church are the gateposts (cut off rather shorter – perhaps the upper parts taken for incorporation in the new church, as apparently were the columns) and a little of the wall on which the railings once stood, and the burial ground. There are roughly 50 graves and monuments although inscriptions are only legible on around 20 of them, the most recent dating from the 1850s.


85-5f-11: Air St and Wincolmlee, 1985 – River Hull

18th September 2017

Taken just a few feet from the previous image, this shows the corner of St Mary’s Burial Ground at the junction of Air St and Bankside. The earth here appears to have recently been cleared, and is now rather more overgrown.

At the extreme right is one of the truncated posts of the gate that led into the churchyard, and to the left of that two slimmer posts, one for a street light and the other for the road sign. The shadow of this latter amused me by adding a cross to the churchyard.

Across Bankside, a wall with a gate is of one of the wharves on the west bank of the River Hull, now disused and empty, part of a long riverside site for Seatons. The company John L Seaton & Co Ltd, was founded by John Love Seaton (1820–1903), born in Chatham, Kent, who became an alderman and mayor of Hull in 1873-74. His Mayoral portrait in the Guildhall by Ernest Gustave Girardot is one of the better examples of the genre. Its main business was in crushing rape seed to extract the oil, then known as colza oil.

Colza was widely used in oil lamps to provide light, with the residue after extraction becoming animal feed. The first lighting installed in railway carriages was provide by colza, but was later replaced by gas – and then electricity. Perhaps more importantly for Hull, this was the oil used to calm troubled waters and was carried in all ship’s lifeboats for this purpose. It was also widely used as a lubricant, and is now extracted mainly for use as bio-diesel, particularly in Germany. Different varieties of rape are grown for the rapeseed oil now widely used in cooking.

The business obviously did well, with Alderman Seaton leaving over £50,000 in his will. The company amalgamated with others over the years developing a wide range of vegetable oils and oil-related products and in 1970 was acquired by Croda International. Production at its site in Hull continued until 2002 and for some years after this it had offices in Hessle, but is now simply a trade name used by Croda.

The buildings whose triangular gables are visible are on the far side of the river and are an Enterprise Zone, part of the River Hull Heartlands Foster St development site.The site was once a brickworks and is privately owned.


85-5f-14: Air St and Bankside, 1985 – River Hull

19th September 2017

Taken near to the corner of Air St and Bankside, but nothing in the image enables me to identify the exact location, though I think it is probably at a corner of the site of John L Seaton & Co Ltd.

I made two exposures from exactly the same position, this and another in portrait format, which shows the metal chimney to have been rather tall, and it is possibly on the site of Holmes Hall’s Sculcoates Tannery on the south side of Air St. The fixed viewpoint suggests to me it could have been taken with the lens poked through a fence or gate.


85-5f-15: Air St area, 1985 – River Hull

20th September 2017

Steam issuing from a pipe at the top left confirms that the North Works of John L Seaton & Co Ltd on Air St was still at work. This rather handsome brick building was perhaps rather suprisingly still there when I last looked, as were the pipes bridging the road, although the name board is long gone, presumably removed when production there ceased in 2002 if not before.

Beyond Seaton’s North Works the picture shows (just) the Golden Ball pub and I think some further buildings which I seem to remember included a small shop selling sweets and cigarettes. Air St is the eastern end of Sculcoates Lane and was probably built around 1800, and the Golden Ball probably dated from about then (there is a detailed discussion on Paul Gibson’s site (http://www.paul-gibson.com/pubs-and-breweries/air-street-pubs.php) and was definitely a pub by 1810, though extended and altered later. It was listed as the Blue Ball in 1823, but changed its name to the Golden Ball around 1882. There were further alterations in the 20th century, but as the factories around closed, trade dropped off in the 1970s and 80s, and the pub was demolished in 1996 when Seaton’s wanted more storage space. Only six years later they ended work on the site.


85-5f-44: John L Seaton & Co Ltd, Air St, 1985 – River Hull

21st September 2017

Thanks to comments on-line I can now be sure that this picture is of Victoria Terrace, off Stepney Lane and shows the Grade II listed chimney of Beverley Rd Baths. Unfortunately this appears to have been demolished. There is a chimney somewhere near, but it is a plain brick affair. The listing text for Beverley Rd Baths describes the chimney as “At the rear, a tall panelled chimney stack, formerly with a decorative cap.”

One of my wife’s great aunts, Florrie Needley, kept a small corner shop on Stepney Lane close to here that I visited back in the 1960s, I think on one of the corners of this terrace. I remember it as selling sweets, but I think it also sold other foods, and some wives in the area would bring in the money their husbands gave to them after they were paid for safe-keeping, as they were afraid that after having drunk the cash they had kept back their husbands would take it back from them.

This terrace was clearly still inhabited in 1985, with washing hanging out and windows open, but has almost certainly been demolished since. The boat has number 497 and I can read the word ‘TRINITY’ but what follows is impossible to make out. The front yards on the opposite side of the terrace are slightly wider and opposite the boat but just out of frame was a small caravan in one of them, though it was hard to see how it could ever be moved out.


85-5g-22: Terrace with boat, Victoria Terrace, Stepney Lane, 1985 – Beverley Rd


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