Posts Tagged ‘Campaign Against Climate Change’

Kyoto & One In Love – 2005

Friday, February 12th, 2021

The texts from two posts from My London Diary for Saturday 12 Feb 2005, sixteen years ago. I’ve had to change the formatting a little to fit this site, but otherwise the text is identical. There are more pictures from each event on My London Diary.

Campaign against Climate Change Kyoto Climate March

London, 12 Feb, 2005

When i talked about the dangers of increasing co2 emission and the need to cut down use of fossil fuels 35 years ago, i was a crank. now everyone except the usa oil lobby and their political poodles recognises that climate change is for real. even blair has recognised it as the most vital issue facing us, threatening the future of the planet, although actually taking effective action still is a step too far for him. however he did call for a conference to examine the problem, which told him and us that we had perhaps ten years to take action before it would be to late.

Caroline Lucas

kyoto is history now thanks to the US boycott, (although it comes into effect this week), but it should have been the first inadequate step on the road to action. every journey has to start somehow, and even a half-hearted step is better than none, and would have led the way to others. what got in its way was texan oil interests, whose political face is george w bush.

i’ve photographed most of the campaign against climate change’s kyoto marches over the past few years. this one was probably the largest, and certainly excited more media interest, truly a sign that the issue has become news.

starting in lincoln’s inn fields, the march stopped first outside the uk offices of exxonmobil, on the corner of kingsway, for a brief declaration, then for a longer demonstration outside the australian high commission in aldwych (with guest appearances by ‘john howard’ and an australian ‘grim reaper’ with cork decorated hat), before making its way past trafalgar square and picadilly circus to the us embassy.


O-I-L One in Love

Reclaim Love, Eros, Picadilly Circus, London, London, 12 Feb, 2005

i left them in picadilly and returned to eros, where o-i-l, one in love, were organising a small gathering to “reclaim love” and “send love and healing to all the beings in the world” on the eve of valentine’s day. it’s something we could all do with, and it was good to see people enjoying themselves around the statue of eros, in what is usually one of the most depressing spots on london’s tourist circuit.

there was the samba band again, rhythms of resistance, (hi guys) and dancing and people generally being happy and friendly and free reclaim love t shirts and apart from the occasional showers it was harmless fun. rather to my surprise, the police either didn’t notice it or decided to ignore it, an unusually sensible strategy.


More pictures of both events on My London Diary.

This year there can be no street party at Eros in Piccadilly Circus, but Venus CuMara invites you to celebrate the 20th anniversary of Operation Infinite Love, Global Annual Love and Peace Meditation/street party by joining her on her Youtube ‘love stream / live stream/ life stream’ Global Love Meditation at 3.33 pm on St Valentine’s Day, Sunday 14th February 2021.

“MAY ALL THE BEINGS IN ALL THE WORLDS BE HAPPY AND AT PEACE”


My London Diary : London Photos : Hull : River Lea/Lee Valley : London’s Industrial Heritage : Flickr

All photographs on this and my other sites, unless otherwise stated, are taken by and copyright of Peter Marshall, and are available for reproduction or can be bought as prints.


‘Free the Table’ and more

Saturday, December 12th, 2020

Five years ago on Saturday 12th December I had another busy day travelling to events around London. I began at Stratford on the east of London, the opposite side of London to where I live, but now a relatively easy journey since the opening of the Jubilee line there at the end of 1999.

For the previous couple of years I’d been following the progress and protests of Focus E15, formed when Newham Council planned to close down a hostel for young mothers in Stratford and scatter them to private rented accommodation often hundreds of miles away. They stood their ground and got more local rehousing, but, appalled by the activities of the council and its Mayor Robin Wales, continued to take action over the failure of Newham Council to sensibly address the acute housing problem in the borough, which has around 5,000 people living in temporary accommodation and while 400 homes in the Carpenters Estate close to the centre of Stratford have been empty for up to ten years. They accuse the council of ‘social cleansing’, attempting to force those needing housing out of London.

Apart from various actions, including preventing evictions and embarrassing the Mayor by confronting him at public events Focus E15 had held a weekly Saturday street stall on the wide pavement at Stratford Broadway, handing out leaflets and advice to the public on housing issues.

Although their weekly protest was legal, it clearly annoyed the council, and on Saturday 5th December Newham Law Enforcement officer John Oddie arrived, assisted by several police officers and confronted the campaigners and told them they were not allowed to protest there, and that unless they immediately packed up their stall, sound system, banners and other gear it would be seized. The group made clear that they would not move and following some argument, police seized a table and threw it in the back of their van.

It soon became clear that this action by police and the council officer had been illegal, and the council asked the protesters to come and collect the table. They replied asking the council to return it to them at the following week’s protest, and advertised this widely as a ‘Free the Focus E15 Table’ event, making considerable humorous mileage out of the council and police gaffe. The council didn’t turn up with the table, but there a number of other tables there, celebrating ‘Tablegate’ and although the local newspaper seemed to be boycotting the event (could they possibly attract considerable revenue from publishing official council notices) a BBC local news crew came along to film a few interviews.

Free the Focus E15 Table


I couldn’t stay until the end but caught the tube back to central London where the Campaign against Climate Change were protesting against the inadequacy of the COP21 Paris deal, which sets the target temperature rise too high, has no way to enforce the measures needed and will allow the giant corporations to continue to prevent governments from carrying out effective green measures.

After a short rally in Old Palace Yard the protesters unrolled a 300m length of bright red fabric, carrying it above their heads across Westminster Bridge. It was a tricky to photograph but visually effective reminder of the need of governments to take urgent action to keep fossil fuels – including shale oil, with fracking now shown to be as dirty as coal – in the ground, or at least only to be extracted as chemical feedstock rather than fuel, and an increased urgency in the transition to renewable energy.


As I was photographing on Westminster Bridge, I was surprised to see a group of several hundred Santas on BMX bikes riding across on the opposite carriageway and rushed across to take a few pictures. I later found that this was an annual BMX Charity ride – which I went to photograph in 2019.

Later in the day I went to Trafalgar Square where a completely unconnected Santa-themed event was taking place, with Santas arriving at the end of the annual Santacon, a largely alcohol fuelled festive costume ramble through London.

Pictures from both Santa events are in Santas in London.


In late afternoon, solidarity campaigners and Syrian activists met for a vigil opposite Downing St vigil demanded justice for refugees, opening of EU borders to those fleeing war and terrorism and a much more generous response from the UK government.

It was a candlelit vigil, but a gusty wind blew out the flames as soon as they were lit until someone went to buy plastic cups to act as windshields though these rather hid the actual flames.

The response of the British government to the refugee crisis, particularly from Syria, but also from elsewhere around the world is seen by many to be abysmal. Even after considerable pushing from the British people which forced David Cameron to increase numbers, the UK was only promising to take 20,000 in the next five years, while Canada will take more – 25,000 – in a single year.



Christmas Solidarity Vigil for Refugees
Santas in London
Climate Activists Red Line protest
Free the Focus E15 Table


My London Diary : London Photos : Hull : River Lea/Lee Valley : London’s Industrial Heritage : Flickr

All photographs on this and my other sites, unless otherwise stated, are taken by and copyright of Peter Marshall, and are available for reproduction or can be bought as prints.


Climate Justice

Friday, December 4th, 2020

2005

Around this time of year I’ve often been photographing marches for Climate Justice. I think the first at this time of year on My London Diary was probably on Dec 3rd 2005, when around 10,000 of us took part in a march through London led by the Campaign Against Climate Change as a part of an international day of climate protest.

2007

It wasn’t of course the first climate protest that I had photographed, and there are a number of earlier events covered in my diary which were also largely or entirely about the climate crisis:

Kyoto march to US Embassy, London, July 2001
Bush at Buck Palace, July 2001
Bush gets Busted, July 2001
Campaign for Climate Change, March 2002
Bush / Raymond Wedding March, Nov 2002
Kyoto march to US Embassy, London, Mar 2003
Kyoto Climate March, London, Feb 2005
London isn’t Venice, Yet!, Paddington, Apr 2005

2010

I’d had a strong interest in environmental matters since my student days back in the 60’s, although then our main attention was on the problems of pollution, population growth, food supply and resource depletion. That was before I really began to take photographs, and I can’t remember any protests or direct action over these issues (we had other things on our minds too) though I did write and speak very embarrasingly in public on them. And I became a Friend of the Earth when the organisation only existed in California though I was living in the UK.

2011

Although I bought my first digital camera in 1999, it was only a fairly primitive model, and not useable for serious photography despite what was described in reviews at the time as a “huge 2.3 megapixels sensor“, and until the end of 2003 all my real work was on film. The camera that changed that was the Nikon D100, still only 6Mp, but with much higher quality.

2011

It was this camera that really brought ‘My London Diary‘ to life, though as soon as Nikon brought out the much improved D70 I bought on – and then the D200 and D300, finally moving to full-frame. But for several years I worked with both digital and film, continuing to work mainly with a Hexar F with Leica and Voigtlander wide angle lenses, with just a cheap mid-range Nikkor zoom permanently on the Nikon. For quite a while it was the only Nikon lens I owned, and not changing lenses when working avoided getting dust on the sensor, and I only bought a second lens – the Sigma 12-24 zoom when I had a second body. But after than lenses quickly multiplied!

2005

After I had two DSLR bodies I quickly abandoned film, except for working with the various panoramic cameras that I was using mainly for landscape work. Although I made some panoramas digitally combining multiple exposures it was a few years (and considerably larger image files) before I worked out how I no longer needed film or special cameras to produce the kind of panoramic results I wanted with a digital camera and was able to quit using film entirely. Of course it has become rather fashionable to work on film now, but although I’ve kept all my old film cameras, I can’t really see that I will ever use them again. Digital is just so much better.

2011

Back to the Climate. At last we are beginning to hear the kind of speeches from people such as the United Nations Secretary General António Guterres that they should have been making years ago. On Monday he stated “The way we are moving is a suicide” and that unless the US cuts carbon emissions to net zero by 2050 humanity’s survival will be impossible.

2010

I’m still unconvinced that governments around the world will heed calls such as this – and that movements such as Extinction Rebellion and Fridays For Future inspired by Greta Thunberg have been dramatising. With our own UK government it is clearly still window-dressing rather than a real committment to change. It still seems that it will be too little too late, and recent reports suggesting targets will be easier than expected to reach are likely to mislead. It certainly will not be easy, and will require truly drastic system changes.

The pictures here are from Climate Marches on December 3rd, 2005, December 8th, 2007, December 4th 2010 and December 3rd 2011.


My London Diary : London Photos : Hull : River Lea/Lee Valley : London’s Industrial Heritage : Flickr

All photographs on this and my other sites, unless otherwise stated, are taken by and copyright of Peter Marshall, and are available for reproduction or can be bought as prints.