Hull Photos: 9/12/17 – 15/12/17

Another digest of daily posts during Hull2017 on Facebook, about the pictures added daily on the intro page at Hull Photos. Comments and corrections to the captions and texts about the pictures are always welcome here or on Facebook.

Hull Photos

9th December

On top of the container is the same boat as in a previous image, but seen from the opposite side. Above the container are warehouses (converted into flats) on the opposite bank of the River Hull, a crane on the Northern Divers site and the raised Drypool Bridge. I was particularly attracted by the drawing of the diving helmet on the side of the container.

85-10l-46: Northern Divers, Tower St, 1985 – River Hull

10th December

Drypool bridge was raised through the whole series of pictures I made on this day, and I think must have been undergoing repair. This view is from a short distance above the bridge looking towards the mouth of the river. Above the tank and pipe at the left are the buildings of Rank’s flour mills. Only the buildings at left remain, now used by Shotwell for cartridge making. The further building, the prominent local landmark of the Clarence Mill, was sadly demolished recently, a terrible loss to the city’s heritage.

The vessel at right is the Burcom Sand, a grab hopper dredger. A further vessel is visible beyond it, but I can’t quite make out its name, but I think was probably another dredger.

85-10l-51: River Hull from the east bank, 1985 – River Hull

11th December

This picture was taken from an identical viewpoint as the previous image and I clearly intended the two to be viewed together, possibly joined as a single panoramic image (though this was very tricky before it became possible to use computer software on digital files) but more likely as a diptych. The shed in the centre of the image is on the opposite bank of the River Hull and was a part of the Yorkshire Dry Dock’s premises. Above a roof near the right edge you can see the cupola on the Old Dock Offices on Dock Office Row and next to it the top of the Guildhall.

The two images do merge perfectly in software to form a wider view, but cropping to give a rectangular format results in the loss of some of the peripheral subject matter and I prefer to show them as separate images.

85-10l-52: River Hull from the east bank, 1985 – River Hull

Here is the joined image:

(as with all images in these posts, right-clicking and selecting ‘Open image in new tab will give you a larger version.)

12th December

This view is looking upstream from the east bank of the River Hull. The industrial premises at left have been replaced by a new block of apartments and the warehouse on the opposite side of the road is now waste ground used for parking and Napoleons Casino. The flats further back are still there, at the north end of Trippet St.

85-10l-53: North Bridge and River Hull, 1985 – River Hull

13th December

I think I took this picture as a mystery, and its one I was unable to solve. The lettering on the sign was almost lost and the only parts which are clear are those that are obvious, the ‘&Co…Ltd’ and on the lower line ‘WAREHOUSE’. Between the Co and the Ltd is a year, probably 1928, which could well be when this shed was erected.

I puzzled at some length over the name, which is hardly clearer on the full size image than on the small web version. It certainly seems to have a B and a T, perhaps and initial and ‘ABBOTT.

Thanks to Mike Patterson for giving me the answer on Facebook that this was Garbutt and Co on Great Union St. I still wonder what the word before WAREHOUSE was. The BU is pretty clear but I can’t make out the rest.

The Garbutts are an old Hull family, but I can’t find anything about this business on-line. A William Garbutt was one of Hull’s early Quakers around 1660, and later at the start of the 19th century Robert Garbutt was a Methodist, and the Garbutts were apparently a leading Primitive Methodist family in the area. William Parkinson Garbutt lived on Anlaby Rd, as did David Parkinson Garbutt his son, who was the developer of the Avenues area off Princes Rd; his brother William had a ship building business.

85-10l-54: Garbutt and Co Warehouse, Great Union St, 1985 – East Hull

14th December

The sign on the top of the building I think reads ‘Official Agents For Wingate Plant Building Machinery‘, and although much changed, to my surprise all the buildings in this picture were still standing earlier this year when I walked briefly down Coelus St, off Great Union St. The foreground building has lost all its doors and windows and was just white plaster with no visible signage, but the large shed was BSR Body Style Refinishers ‘For All Your Body Work Needs‘. Later this year there was a report in the Hull Daily Mail of a fire in their premises.

Coelus (or Caelus) was the main Roman god of the sky and also used to mean the sky or heaven – as in ‘Regina Coeli’: though few would now confuse this street with heaven it seems to most likely derivation for the name. It is also the name of a whole genus of tropical plants (coming from the ancient Greek for sheath) and a family of beetles, and could be a rather unusual family name, perhaps a variant of Cole. But I can find no information about the origin of the name of this street, now best known as the address of one of Hull’s several dance schools on the opposite side of the road.

85-10l-55: Coelus St, 1985 – East Hull

15th December

Surprisingly this picture on Hedon Rd could more or less be taken today, and the scene is slightly brighter than when I photographed it, with the Victoria pub having been done up and reopened as the Victoria Hotel Monkey House. The pub, built around 1850, is a Grade II listed building and used to be a popular dockers’ pub – and they gave it the nickname which is now a part of its official name. Like other pubs along Hull’s dockland fringes it also had a reputation as a part of Hull’s red light area.

N R Burnett is a timber company founded in Hull in 1935 by Norman Rutherford Burnett and became a private limited company in 1941. During the war it was based in York, but returned to Hull in 1945, and was based at the Albert Mill her in Popple St until 1960 when it moved to larger premises in Great Union St. It was one of the first suppliers for caravan builders. They still operate from sites in Sutton Fields Industrial Estate, Hull and Ossett as an importer and merchant of panel products, softwood and hardwood timbers.

85-10l-56: Hedon Road and Popple St, 1985 – East Hull

You can see the new pictures added each day at Hull Photos, and I post them with the short comments above on Facebook.
Comments and corrections to captions are welcome here or on Facebook.


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My London Diary : Buildings of London : River Lea/Lee Valley : London’s Industrial Heritage

All photographs on this and my other sites, unless otherwise stated, are taken by and copyright of Peter Marshall, and are available for reproduction or can be bought as prints.

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